Personal Finance Education

New Topic on EconEdLink: Election Economics

EconEdLink 1318  e1462302232555 New Topic on EconEdLink: Election Economics

The Council for Economic Education is pleased to announce the release of a series of lesson plans to help educators (grades 9-12) teach the election and economics in their economics, civics, government, and other social studies courses. The lessons are all available for free on our teacher website EconEdLink.

Topics covered include:

  • Can Election Futures Markets Be More Accurate Than Polls?
  • Voters and Elections (Who Votes and Why?)
  • Money and Elections, Economic Misery and Presidential Elections, and more

Throughout the summer, additional lessons will be added on important campaign topics as the campaign continues to unfold, and CEE will also be hosting a free webinar for teachers on how to incorporate these lessons into their classrooms.

To ensure that you receive information about upcoming webinars and new materials available on EconEdLink, you can register for free at the following URL: www.econedlink.org/register.

If you have any questions, please contact April Somboun.

POSTED: May 4, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Graduating From Test Scores to Credit Scores

DSC6347Brian Page 8x10 hi res for print 150x150 Graduating From Test Scores to Credit Scores

Written by: Brian Page, Chair, Council for Economic Education Teacher Advisory Council

Later this spring, high schools across the country will be graduating students from a world of test scores to a world of credit scores. Many teens will unknowingly be making decisions that will impact them in the decade to come. Yet most lawmakers have fallen short of respecting personal finance as a dedicated subject worthy of stand alone classes required for graduation, taught by teachers trained to teach it well. It’s time we work together to advocate on behalf of high school students to prepare them for the real world.

High school science, math and language arts teachers receive content specific instruction in college, and are required to pass content specific tests to earn teacher certification. Personal finance… not so much. Often times when mandates are passed, they require the integration of personal finance into other coursework. The mandate is often dumped into the laps of teachers who have never been trained to teach personal finance.

A FINRA Investor Education Foundation-funded study, State Financial Education Mandates: It’s All in the Implementation, examined the effectiveness of state mandates on financial education for high-school students. The study noted that if a rigorous financial education program is carefully implemented, it can improve the credit scores and lower the probability of credit delinquency for young adults. In other words, we need to train our teachers, require semester courses devoted to personal finance, and use hands on teaching methods that focus on relevant content.

NCLB aside, our country has historically been a locally controlled education system. This changed following the financial collapse in 2008. Somehow a banking collapse led to education “reform”, and schools were faced with a multitude of new evaluation systems and testing requirements. Subsequently, schools and lawmakers now seem to lack the appetite to pass further education mandates. This should not preclude us from trying, using a common sense approach that does not further burden our schools. I’m confident that if asked, parents and teens would be much happier about recent reform efforts if standardized test scores were a little less important, and helping them build their own credit scores were a little more important.

POSTED: April 7, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

65 Years of Delivering Economic Education and Financial Literacy

Since its inception in 1948 the Council for Economic Education has made it its mission to deliver economic education and financial literacy to K-12 students nationwide. In this overview, you’ll see how for the past 65 years the Council has used ever-changing techniques to educate the educators. By equipping teachers with innovative resources, the Council has made great strides in improving the education of economics and personal finance in our schools.

Watch CEE’s New 2014 Overview Video

POSTED: November 10, 2014 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Teach Your Child Sound Economic Principles

Selena Swartzfager hs rgb1 Teach Your Child Sound Economic PrinciplesSelena Swartzfager, leader of the Mississippi Council for Economic Education, writes an insightful article about second chances and the importance of raising your children to know sound economic principles. Swartzfager believes that no one is ever too young to become financially literate. It doesn’t matter if you’re only twelve, you can still learn about opportunity costs, the importance of savings and W-9s.

POSTED: October 21, 2014 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School on Having a Digital Classroom

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 8 of 8.

Lisa Bender from Southern Garret High School in Oakland, Maryland, has spent her career teaching economics fusing it with her other passion, immersive technology for the classroom. For her, economics lessons come alive when they are paired with the ground breaking information found on web portals and discovered with easy to use platforms such as tablets. With these tools, Ms. Bender is able to teach complementary lessons on economics and digital citizenship by showing students what tools to use and how to use them responsibly.

This completes CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education. Keep checking back for more weekly updates on our blog!

POSTED: August 27, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary on Combining Music and Economics

CEE’s Blog Series on Teaching Techniques delivers teaching ‘best practices’ from practitioners in the field. These K-12 teachers from all over the United States present their proven tactics and techniques that keep their students interested and engaged in learning economics and personal finance concepts and lessons. Part 7 of 8.

Mary Neely from Orchard Grove Elementary in Frederick, Maryland, incorporated singing into her classroom help her students to grasp economics concepts. By serving as an example of combining music and economics, Ms. Neely inspired students (singers and non-singers alike) to create their own individual pieces of music, using concepts they learned and implementing them their own way, proving that they understood what was taught.

Stay tuned for the next edition of CEE’s new Blog Series, Teaching Techniques: Classroom Innovation on Economic Education on August 27th, 2014.

POSTED: August 20, 2014 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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