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Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy Webinar

girl scouts logo 300x124 Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy Webinar

Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy webinar
May 13, 2013
2-3 pm ET

Please register here.

While lack of financial literacy is a growing concern for many today, relatively little research has been conducted on how girls think about and experience money and finances. To address this gap, the Girl Scout Research Institute (GSRI) conducted a nationwide survey with over 1,000 girls ages 8−17 and their parents to better understand girls’ level of financial literacy and attitudes towards money.

Join Girl Scouts of the USA on May 13 for a webinar that will highlight both the results of the recently released GSRI study Having It All: Girls and Financial Literacy and Girl Scouts of the USA’s national program portfolio. As well, Louisa Quittman from the Department of the Treasury will provide a perspective on federal policy and resources for promoting financial education among young people.

Webinar presenters include:

  • Kimberlee Salmond, Senior Research Strategist at the Girl Scout Research Institute.
  • Louisa Quittman, Director of Financial Education at the U.S. Department of the Treasury.
  • Andrea Bastiani Archibald, Ph.D., Developmental Psychologist at Girl Scouts of the USA.

The national survey and webinar are conducted by the Girl Scouts of the USA. CEE supports their financial literacy efforts, although we are not formally connected with this work. If you have questions, please reach out to the Girl Scouts directly.

POSTED: May 12, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

CEE in the News: Recession doesn’t change students’ econ savvy.

April was Financial Literacy Month, and educators, families, non-profit organizations and businesses across the country rallied in support of financial education.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress released The Nation’s Report Card: Economics 2012, Grade 12 at the end of April. These tests are administered by the National Assessment Governing Board, who develop assessment frameworks in mathematics, reading, writing, science, geography, U.S. history, civics, economics, the arts and technological literacy.

Students’ scores of economic literacy changed little between 2006 and 2012, suggesting that the national discussion about the millions of jobs that were lost and homes that were foreclosed didn’t translate to higher academic achievement. During that period, several states added an economics course to high school offerings and some started requiring it to earn a diploma.

The article “Recession doesn’t change students’ econ savvy” shares thoughts from financial literacy and economic education leaders, including Annamaria Lusardi, CEE board member, and Nan J. Morrison, CEE’s President and CEO.

CEE’s work has been mentioned specifically by Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke; “Financial education supports not only individual well-being, but also the economic health of our nation,” Bernanke told a town hall-style meeting with teachers in 2012. “As the recent financial crisis illustrates, consumers who can make informed decisions about financial products and services not only serve their own best interests, but, collectively, they also help promote broader economic stability.”

POSTED: May 6, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

Raising the Bar for Financial Literacy Education through New Standards

The new National Standards for Financial Literacy, developed by CEE in conjunction with a team of experienced and talented economists, education specialists at Federal Reserve banks, and financial education researchers, provide a framework for teaching personal finance in kindergarten through 12th grade. The standards will assist educators and school districts to build a framework for teaching financial literacy in your school.

The standards contain the areas of knowledge and understanding that are fundamental to personal finance:

  • Earning Income
  • Buying Goods and Services
  • Using Credit
  • Saving
  • Financial Investing
  • Protecting and Insuring

Each of these six standards includes benchmarks outlining what a student should be able to understand and examples at the 4th, 8th and 12th grade levels of how the student might demonstrate this understanding.  The benchmarks also emphasize decision-making skills by explicitly relating planning and goal setting, financial decision making, and assessing outcomes to each standard.

Watch our short video for an introduction to the new standards. Download a free copy here.

national standards for financial literacy overview video Raising the Bar for Financial Literacy Education through New Standards

POSTED: May 3, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

Cocktail Party Advice: Never an Economist and Always an Advocate for K-12 Personal Financial Education

Andrew Hill1 225x300 Cocktail Party Advice: Never an Economist and Always an Advocate for K 12 Personal Financial EducationBy Andrew Hill, Economic Education Advisor at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia; and Adjunct Professor of Economics at Temple University.

Cocktail party conversation can often be difficult for even the most adept conversationalists among us. When meeting new people, an unavoidable topic is always what you do for a living. I was trained in graduate school to expect people to respond in unpredictable ways when I explain that I am an economist. Read more…

POSTED: April 30, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Are Today’s Teens at Risk of Becoming Tomorrow’s “Basement Generation?”

Jack Kosakowski 200x300 Are Today’s Teens at Risk of Becoming Tomorrow’s “Basement Generation?”By Jack E. Kosakowski, President and Chief Executive Officer of Junior Achievement USA.

In the next couple of months, millions of American teens will be graduating from high school. There was a time when this meant many kids would go off to college, get a degree and start a career. But in recent years, for a variety of reasons, including a sluggish economy and the growing skills gap in the American workforce, many kids are heading back home to live in mom and dad’s basement after receiving that college degree. A reality reinforced by recent assessments of Census data by Pew Research Center showing that more than one-in-four adults between the ages of 25 and 34 had moved back with their parents at one time or another during the “Great Recession.” Read more…

POSTED: April 26, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , , , ,

CEE in the News: New Standards

First Financial Federal Credit Union features CEE’s new National Standards for Financial Literacy on their site.

“In coming weeks and months, a new set of standards for financial literacy will cross the desks of educators across the country. The hope is that schools will embrace these guideposts and begin to wedge money lessons into students’ daily activities.

The Council for Economic Education, a nonprofit promoting financial education, developed the new standards at the request of and with input from educators at all levels. “We have a specific plan to go state by state and get these implemented,” says Nan Morrison, CEO of the council.”

Read the full story here.

POSTED: April 19, 2013 | BY: admin | TAGS: , , , , , ,

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