Education

Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

If you thought Keurigs have made paper coffee filters a thing of the past, think again. From filtration systems and custom hand-held fans to lampshades and taco holders, students participating in this year’s Meaningful Economics (ME*) Competition came up with creative new uses for Melitta Bentz’s 106-year old patented product.

ME Comp Meaningful Economics* Competition – Hands on Learning for Delaware Students

A group of students brainstorm at this year’s ME* Competition.

The ME* Competition, produced by the University of Delaware’s Center for Economic Education and Entrepreneurship with support from the Delaware CEE, was held recently in May, inviting Delaware elementary students to design products or services which solved an economic problem—this year’s being to help producers clear leftover inventories in a post-Keurig world.

Participating teams gave their designs catchy names, determined target markets, priced products, and planned modes of distribution. The resulting plans were then pitched to a panel of judges.

Teams were also judged in written test and production activity rounds. For the latter, students assembled a card game, matching idioms related to the use of money with their meanings. Students cut and pasted while learning about team management and job specialization, ultimately being judged by the quality and quantity of their output.

This year marked the ME* Competition’s 28th run, involving 550 students throughout Delaware. It is produced annually in partnership with Bank of America and Discover with the help of judges from Capital One and JPMorgan Chase.

POSTED: June 11, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Hidden Costs of College

Hidden Costs of College 714x1024 The Hidden Costs of CollegeCollege seems to have many costs everyone forgets to mention, especially at orientation. Going in, everyone has ideas what their four years will cost: tuition, room and board, and money for other essentials. Now add the fees for that prestigious fraternity/sorority that you have been eying, paying for plane tickets and everything else when you take a summer or semester abroad, and finding some fantastic internship where you realize what it is that you are going to do (or not do) with your life, which is also usually unpaid. On top of this, there’s the possibility of extra semesters because remediation, a failed class, switch of majors, or transfers and there are even costs for graduating. All this isn’t to say that college is expensive so you should skip out on it, as college graduates with a Bachelor’s Degree earn on average $800,000 more in a lifetime compared to those who don’t have degrees. This is here, however, to open your eyes to the potential costs that lay ahead of you. Hopefully this list will help you plan so you can do all that you desire to do and come out with a degree in hand, a couple years of great memories, and a little less debt.

Written by Fisher Derderian, a rising junior at The King’s College in downtown Manhattan studying Politics, Philosophy, and Economics. He is currently a marketing intern at the Council for Economic Education.

POSTED: June 5, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE launches Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus

Last week on May 21, the Council for Economic Education hosted Senator Jack Reed (RI) and Senator Mike Enzi (WY) in Washington, DC for a very exciting announcement: the official launch of the Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus, a bipartisan effort to ensure that all Americans are equipped with the essential skills and education they need.

senateFEL1 300x198 CEE launches Senate Financial and Economic Literacy Caucus

Senator Jack Reed (RI) talking with CEE CEO & President Nan Morrison (right) and RI CEE President Margaret Brooks (left).

Senator Reed stressed the importance of bringing people from all sides together to address the issue of financial literacy, “a critical problem for future generations.” Financial education is a lifelong endeavor, he continued, and “has to start in elementary and secondary schools, and lead into the college arena.”  The Caucus, he hopes, will be a “catalyst for positive change.”

Senator Enzi addressed the need for access to information and tools to help Americans make the right choices, like saving for retirement, buying insurance, or investing.

Following their remarks, the room turned its attention to an important and timely question: what role should the federal government play in supporting financial literacy? Read more…

POSTED: May 28, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , ,

Is Your School Churning Out Best-Selling Engineers in Five Languages? Didn’t Think So.

April 28 Is Your School Churning Out Best Selling Engineers in Five Languages? Didn’t Think So.By Dan Kadlec, Author and Journalist.

In the era of Big Data, we can’t seem to tie our own shoes without first confirming the need through statistics. Yet some things are so big and so obvious we shouldn’t wait—like, say, stopping texting while driving or rebuilding our middle class.

Do we really need data to know that distracted drivers cause accidents? Isn’t it a given that a shrinking middle class is a drag on the economy? Financial education is like that too. Can anyone really argue against teaching money basics to kids who will come of age in a world with few financial safety nets? Read more…

POSTED: April 28, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Investing in Personal Finance Today

April 25 Investing in Personal Finance Today

By Amy Rosen, President & CEO of Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship (NFTE).

There are many things we expect young people to learn.

To give them the best possible chance in a shrinking job market, we want students to focus on STEM subjects – science, technology, engineering and math. We also expect them to be good writers. Demonstrate good social skills and manners. And, dear to my heart, learn an entrepreneurial mindset of ambition, persistence and creativity. And on and on. Read more…

POSTED: April 25, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Once is Not Enough—Together, Yes We Can

April 23 Once is Not Enough—Together, Yes We CanBy Helen Roberts, Clinical Professor in Economics at UIC and Director, UIC Center for Economic Education.

Practice Makes Perfect

How can our children learn the necessary skills and knowledge to be financially literate? Like reading and driving and other important life skills, one try, one course, one time is not enough to be proficient.

To learn to drive a car, students must learn the rules of the road. To drive their financial lives, students need to learn the rules of good financial life, such the importance of saving, budgeting, and protecting their money. Just as reading about driving is not enough, students need to practice as they go. Read more…

POSTED: April 23, 2014 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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