Economics

Gina Boyd Awarded the 2016 John Morton Excellence in Teaching Award

Gina Head shot pic cropped1 Gina Boyd Awarded the 2016 John Morton Excellence in Teaching AwardGina Boyd, a teacher at Mayflower Mill Elementary School, has been awarded the 2016 John Morton Excellence in Teaching Award.

The award recognizes Boyd for her outstanding work in teaching economics and financial literacy to her students. It also recognizes her efforts in organizing after-school workshops for other teachers so they could learn how to incorporate economics into their own course work. With her work in and out of the classroom, Gina Boyd has demonstrated her commitment to raising the bar for economics and financial literacy education. She will receive her well-deserved reward at the Financial Literacy and Economic Education conference on Oct. 7 in Phoenix.

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POSTED: September 29, 2016 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

2016 Student Video Contest

landing page banner1 2016 Student Video Contest

IT’S ELECTION SEASON

And we want to get K-12 students thinking about the next president and the economic future of the country. That’s why we’re inviting you to participate in our election video contest!

WHAT SHOULD THE VIDEO BE ABOUT?

We’re asking you to record one or a group of students answering the following question in 60 seconds or less:

“WHAT SHOULD THE NEXT PRESIDENT DO TO IMPROVE THE ECONOMY?”

BE CREATIVE! Video entries must be less than 60 seconds. All entries must be submitted by 11:59 pm, September 30th, 2016.

WINNERS & PRIZES

There are two winners for the CEE Video contest:

12 2016 Student Video Contest

Viewers’ Choice will be selected by popular vote (voting begins October 3rd, 2016). The Economists’ Choice will be selected by CEE’s panel of judges. Winning teams (2) will receive a $500 AMEX gift card for the teacher and $25 AMEX gift cards for each participating student. Winners will be announced on October 12, 2016.

READY TO ENTER?

Please review the rules and FAQs before entering the contest. Teachers must enter the videos on behalf of their students. Teachers may enter more than one video per class.

CEE is a bipartisan non-profit organization; no candidates can be mentioned by name or imitated.

vid contest button 2016 Student Video Contest


NEED SOME INSPIRATION?

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COMPLIMENTARY LESSON PLANS

While your students are busy putting their videos together, bolster their learning experience with lessons on the election cycle and the U.S government.

  • Economic Misery and Presidential Elections (gr. 9-12): Teach about how two economic measures, the Misery Index and the growth rate in real GDP per capita, can be used to make predictions about presidential elections.
  • Money and Elections (gr. 9-12): Students will be introduced to the sources of campaign war chests, learning about the recent court decisions that have allowed for the creation of “Super PACS” and 501 (c) (4) organizations.
  • Immigration (gr. 6-12): This lesson helps students better understand immigration, a major issue in the 2016 presidential election.
  • Voters and Elections (gr. 6-8): Students identify costs associated with voting. Then they make predictions about who might be more likely to vote based on their understanding of opportunity costs.
  • President Obama’s Allowance (gr. 3-5): In this lesson, students will identify different expenses in the US budget and will decide on the order of importance for different expenses.

PROMOTE THE CONTEST

Get other teachers and students involved in the video contest. We’ve put together some images to help you spread the word.

To use an image, follow these easy steps:

  1. Choose which image you want to include on your web site from the options below.
  2. Copy and paste the corresponding HTML code into your web page
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POSTED: August 15, 2016 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , ,

New FINRA Study Shows The Need For More Personal Finance Education In Our Schools

FINRA Investor Education Foundation released its 2016 National Financial Capability Study (NFCS) and its findings show that while most Americans are growing more financially capable, there are still millions who struggle with making ends meet – particularly women, millennials, African-Americans, Hispanics, and those lacking a high school education. These findings are drawn from studies that go back to 2009 when the first survey was conducted. Subsequent surveys were conducted in 2012 and 2015.

Among the study’s most significant findings:

  • 56% of respondents with financially dependent children said that they have not set aside money for their children’s college education.
  • Hispanics and African-Americans are much more likely to use high-cost forms of borrowing like pawn shops and payday loans compared to whites—39 percent for African-Americans, 34 percent for Hispanics and 21 percent for whites; and
  • Only 37 percent of respondents are considered to have high financial literacy, meaning they could answer four or more questions on a five-question financial literacy quiz—down from 39 percent in 2012 and 42 percent in 2009.

Based on these findings, it is clear that CEE’s mission is crucial in closing the gap between those who are financially capable and those who are not. To learn more about how you can make a difference in your local community or state, visit our Survey of the States page and take action to help us ensure every student in the U.S. receives a personal finance education.

The survey’s full data set, methodology and related questionnaire are available at USFinancialCapability.org.

POSTED: July 15, 2016 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , ,

Post Campaign Round Up: #MySavingsStory

 

Natalie Zfat Headshot 1 300x300 Post Campaign Round Up: #MySavingsStoryLast month was Financial Literacy Month and we teamed up with social media entrepreneur, Natalie Zfat on the #MySavingsStory video campaign.

Throughout the entire month of April, we shared personal video stories from writers, artists and economists to inform and inspire kids to understand and take control of their financial lives.

We received savings advice from fashion designer Elie Tahari, best-selling author of Diary of A Wimpy KidJeff Kinney, entrepreneur Rosie Pope, President of the Richmond Fed, Jeffrey Lacker and others who shared what they’ve learned about the importance of financial literacy and saving.

Read Natalie’s post about the campaign and make sure to check out the compilation video with all the great advice!

POSTED: May 13, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

New Topic on EconEdLink: Election Economics

EconEdLink 1318  e1462302232555 New Topic on EconEdLink: Election Economics

The Council for Economic Education is pleased to announce the release of a series of lesson plans to help educators (grades 9-12) teach the election and economics in their economics, civics, government, and other social studies courses. The lessons are all available for free on our teacher website EconEdLink.

Topics covered include:

  • Can Election Futures Markets Be More Accurate Than Polls?
  • Voters and Elections (Who Votes and Why?)
  • Money and Elections, Economic Misery and Presidential Elections, and more

Throughout the summer, additional lessons will be added on important campaign topics as the campaign continues to unfold, and CEE will also be hosting a free webinar for teachers on how to incorporate these lessons into their classrooms.

To ensure that you receive information about upcoming webinars and new materials available on EconEdLink, you can register for free at the following URL: www.econedlink.org/register.

If you have any questions, please contact April Somboun.

POSTED: May 4, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Graduating From Test Scores to Credit Scores

DSC6347Brian Page 8x10 hi res for print 150x150 Graduating From Test Scores to Credit Scores

Written by: Brian Page, Chair, Council for Economic Education Teacher Advisory Council

Later this spring, high schools across the country will be graduating students from a world of test scores to a world of credit scores. Many teens will unknowingly be making decisions that will impact them in the decade to come. Yet most lawmakers have fallen short of respecting personal finance as a dedicated subject worthy of stand alone classes required for graduation, taught by teachers trained to teach it well. It’s time we work together to advocate on behalf of high school students to prepare them for the real world.

High school science, math and language arts teachers receive content specific instruction in college, and are required to pass content specific tests to earn teacher certification. Personal finance… not so much. Often times when mandates are passed, they require the integration of personal finance into other coursework. The mandate is often dumped into the laps of teachers who have never been trained to teach personal finance.

A FINRA Investor Education Foundation-funded study, State Financial Education Mandates: It’s All in the Implementation, examined the effectiveness of state mandates on financial education for high-school students. The study noted that if a rigorous financial education program is carefully implemented, it can improve the credit scores and lower the probability of credit delinquency for young adults. In other words, we need to train our teachers, require semester courses devoted to personal finance, and use hands on teaching methods that focus on relevant content.

NCLB aside, our country has historically been a locally controlled education system. This changed following the financial collapse in 2008. Somehow a banking collapse led to education “reform”, and schools were faced with a multitude of new evaluation systems and testing requirements. Subsequently, schools and lawmakers now seem to lack the appetite to pass further education mandates. This should not preclude us from trying, using a common sense approach that does not further burden our schools. I’m confident that if asked, parents and teens would be much happier about recent reform efforts if standardized test scores were a little less important, and helping them build their own credit scores were a little more important.

POSTED: April 7, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

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