Economic Education

Post Campaign Round Up: #MySavingsStory

 

Natalie Zfat Headshot 1 300x300 Post Campaign Round Up: #MySavingsStoryLast month was Financial Literacy Month and we teamed up with social media entrepreneur, Natalie Zfat on the #MySavingsStory video campaign.

Throughout the entire month of April, we shared personal video stories from writers, artists and economists to inform and inspire kids to understand and take control of their financial lives.

We received savings advice from fashion designer Elie Tahari, best-selling author of Diary of A Wimpy KidJeff Kinney, entrepreneur Rosie Pope, President of the Richmond Fed, Jeffrey Lacker and others who shared what they’ve learned about the importance of financial literacy and saving.

Read Natalie’s post about the campaign and make sure to check out the compilation video with all the great advice!

POSTED: May 13, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

New Topic on EconEdLink: Election Economics

EconEdLink 1318  e1462302232555 New Topic on EconEdLink: Election Economics

The Council for Economic Education is pleased to announce the release of a series of lesson plans to help educators (grades 9-12) teach the election and economics in their economics, civics, government, and other social studies courses. The lessons are all available for free on our teacher website EconEdLink.

Topics covered include:

  • Can Election Futures Markets Be More Accurate Than Polls?
  • Voters and Elections (Who Votes and Why?)
  • Money and Elections, Economic Misery and Presidential Elections, and more

Throughout the summer, additional lessons will be added on important campaign topics as the campaign continues to unfold, and CEE will also be hosting a free webinar for teachers on how to incorporate these lessons into their classrooms.

To ensure that you receive information about upcoming webinars and new materials available on EconEdLink, you can register for free at the following URL: www.econedlink.org/register.

If you have any questions, please contact April Somboun.

POSTED: May 4, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , , , ,

Graduating From Test Scores to Credit Scores

DSC6347Brian Page 8x10 hi res for print 150x150 Graduating From Test Scores to Credit Scores

Written by: Brian Page, Chair, Council for Economic Education Teacher Advisory Council

Later this spring, high schools across the country will be graduating students from a world of test scores to a world of credit scores. Many teens will unknowingly be making decisions that will impact them in the decade to come. Yet most lawmakers have fallen short of respecting personal finance as a dedicated subject worthy of stand alone classes required for graduation, taught by teachers trained to teach it well. It’s time we work together to advocate on behalf of high school students to prepare them for the real world.

High school science, math and language arts teachers receive content specific instruction in college, and are required to pass content specific tests to earn teacher certification. Personal finance… not so much. Often times when mandates are passed, they require the integration of personal finance into other coursework. The mandate is often dumped into the laps of teachers who have never been trained to teach personal finance.

A FINRA Investor Education Foundation-funded study, State Financial Education Mandates: It’s All in the Implementation, examined the effectiveness of state mandates on financial education for high-school students. The study noted that if a rigorous financial education program is carefully implemented, it can improve the credit scores and lower the probability of credit delinquency for young adults. In other words, we need to train our teachers, require semester courses devoted to personal finance, and use hands on teaching methods that focus on relevant content.

NCLB aside, our country has historically been a locally controlled education system. This changed following the financial collapse in 2008. Somehow a banking collapse led to education “reform”, and schools were faced with a multitude of new evaluation systems and testing requirements. Subsequently, schools and lawmakers now seem to lack the appetite to pass further education mandates. This should not preclude us from trying, using a common sense approach that does not further burden our schools. I’m confident that if asked, parents and teens would be much happier about recent reform efforts if standardized test scores were a little less important, and helping them build their own credit scores were a little more important.

POSTED: April 7, 2016 | BY: April Somboun | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

CEE Report – Winter 2016

Winter CEE Report Cover CEE Report   Winter 2016In This Issue:

2015 Visionary Awards: A Record-Breaking Year!
Note from Nan
Focus on the Mississippi Council on Economic Education
2015 Accomplishments
54th Annual Financial Literacy and Economic Education Conference
2016 Survey of the States Released
Over 100 Video-Entries for CEE’s Video Contest
An Innovative Digital Assessment Tool to Track Students’ Progress
Integrating Math and Real World Concepts to Hook Kids
2015 Donor Honor Roll

POSTED: February 4, 2016 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , , , ,

The 10th Annual Visionary Awards

 

Last night, the Council for Economic Education (CEE) held its 10th Annual Visionary Awards dinner hosting 300 guests at the Pierre Hotel in New York City. The evening showcased CEE’s mission, our impact to date, and honored leaders who promote economic and financial literacy. The evening was a night of thought-provoking discussion, amiable conversation, and intellectual discourse.

2015 visionary award winners with nan and steve The 10th Annual Visionary Awards

The Visionary Awards were given to four leaders who continue to advance our mission. The honorees were Ann Kaplan, Partner, Circle Wealth Management; Robert E. Moritz, U.S. Chairman and Senior Partner PwC; Prof. Robert J. Shiller, Sterling Professor of Economics, Yale University; and Andrew Ross Sorkin, Founder of DealBook, Financial Columnist for The New York Times, and CNBC Co-Anchor of “Squawk Box.”

During the evening, attendees enjoyed an entertaining fireside chat with the honorees moderated by the evening’s Master of Ceremonies and CNBC’s chief economist reporter, Steve Liesman. The fireside chat addressed hot topics such as women in the workplace, the housing “bubble,” interest rates, and most importantly, how individuals can make an impact to ensure our youth are given the opportunity to learn about economics and personal finance.

va photo 51 The 10th Annual Visionary Awards

CEE also honored three exemplary New York Metropolitan area teachers who advance economic education in and out of the classroom. The teachers received the Alfred P. Sloan Teaching Champion Awards for their excellence in economic education. They continually deliver this important content in and out of their classrooms and achieve results. 

The evening raised over $700,000 to support CEE’s programs and help us reach our goals to reach and teach every child in the United States to create a more informed citizenry capable of making better decisions as savers, investors, borrowers, voters, and participants in the global economy.

We would also like to thank those who attended and to our sponsors who helped make this amazing event happen!

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POSTED: October 30, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , , , , , , , ,

Teachers and Students: Tell us ‘What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?’

CEE is excited to announce the launch of its video contest asking students in kindergarten through 12th grade for the best economic advice they can give the President of the United States. To enter the contest, record one student, or a group of students, answering the following question in 60 seconds or less:

“What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?”

Enter by Wednesday, October 7th at 11:59 p.m. Please note that teachers must enter the videos on behalf of their students. Teachers may enter more than one video per class.

Download a pdf of the rules and FAQ here. Use the hashtag #CEEVidContest to follow the contest on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Watch a video from a past CEE Video Contest Entry

 Teachers and Students: Tell us ‘What Should the President do to Improve the Economy?’

 

The contest is hosted on Facebook. Not all schools allow access to Facebook, so please plan accordingly by uploading your video to Facebook via a computer not associated with your school.

One winner will be chosen by CEE Facebook fans (“Viewers’ Choice”) and one winner will be chosen by economists selected as judges by CEE (“Economists’ Choice”). Prizes include a $500 American Express gift card for each teacher winner, and $25 iTunes gift cards for the student(s) featured in the winning videos.

Video Submission Period
Opens: Thursday, September 10, 2015, 9:00 a.m. ET
Closes: Wednesday, October 7, 2015, 11:59 p.m. ET

Public Voting Period
Starts: Thursday, October 8, 2015, 5:00 p.m ET
Ends: Thursday, October 15, 2015, 3:00 p.m. ET

POSTED: September 10, 2015 | BY: Annamarie Cerreta | TAGS: , , , ,

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