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Congratulations to the winners of CEE’s student video contest, “What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?”

S Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?
S Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?
S Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?

Coming in with almost fifteen hundred votes, the winner of the Viewers’ Choice award is [drum roll]…

Improving the Economy One School Supply at a Time, submitted by  Ms. Keishauna Banks from Deer Park Elementary School.

 Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?

 

For the Economists’ Choice award we have a tie! The two winners are:

Dear Mr. President, submitted by Ms. Amy Dawes from Scullen Middle School.

 Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?

 

and Innovation, Integration, Immigration, submitted by Ms. Amy Tam from Los Altos High School.

 Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?

 

S Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?
S Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?

All winning teams will receive a $500 AMEX gift card for classroom use and $25 AMEX gift cards for each participating students.

Thank you so much for your participation, teachers! The videos made by your students were creative, fun and insightful, and we enjoyed watching them all.

Thank you for all you do to incorporate economics and personal finance in your classroom,

SP F15CDLU Divider Congratulations to the winners of CEEs student video contest, What Should the Next President Do to Improve the Economy?

 

POSTED: October 13, 2016 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , ,

2016 Student Video Contest

landing page banner1 2016 Student Video Contest

IT’S ELECTION SEASON

And we want to get K-12 students thinking about the next president and the economic future of the country. That’s why we’re inviting you to participate in our election video contest!

WHAT SHOULD THE VIDEO BE ABOUT?

We’re asking you to record one or a group of students answering the following question in 60 seconds or less:

“WHAT SHOULD THE NEXT PRESIDENT DO TO IMPROVE THE ECONOMY?”

BE CREATIVE! Video entries must be less than 60 seconds. All entries must be submitted by 11:59 pm, September 30th, 2016.

WINNERS & PRIZES

There are two winners for the CEE Video contest:

12 2016 Student Video Contest

Viewers’ Choice will be selected by popular vote (voting begins October 3rd, 2016). The Economists’ Choice will be selected by CEE’s panel of judges. Winning teams (2) will receive a $500 AMEX gift card for the teacher and $25 AMEX gift cards for each participating student. Winners will be announced on October 12, 2016.

READY TO ENTER?

Please review the rules and FAQs before entering the contest. Teachers must enter the videos on behalf of their students. Teachers may enter more than one video per class.

CEE is a bipartisan non-profit organization; no candidates can be mentioned by name or imitated.

vid contest button 2016 Student Video Contest


NEED SOME INSPIRATION?

Debtonator 300x225 2016 Student Video Contest video contest icon 1 2016 Student Video Contest video contest icon 2 2016 Student Video Contest

COMPLIMENTARY LESSON PLANS

While your students are busy putting their videos together, bolster their learning experience with lessons on the election cycle and the U.S government.

  • Economic Misery and Presidential Elections (gr. 9-12): Teach about how two economic measures, the Misery Index and the growth rate in real GDP per capita, can be used to make predictions about presidential elections.
  • Money and Elections (gr. 9-12): Students will be introduced to the sources of campaign war chests, learning about the recent court decisions that have allowed for the creation of “Super PACS” and 501 (c) (4) organizations.
  • Immigration (gr. 6-12): This lesson helps students better understand immigration, a major issue in the 2016 presidential election.
  • Voters and Elections (gr. 6-8): Students identify costs associated with voting. Then they make predictions about who might be more likely to vote based on their understanding of opportunity costs.
  • President Obama’s Allowance (gr. 3-5): In this lesson, students will identify different expenses in the US budget and will decide on the order of importance for different expenses.

PROMOTE THE CONTEST

Get other teachers and students involved in the video contest. We’ve put together some images to help you spread the word.

To use an image, follow these easy steps:

  1. Choose which image you want to include on your web site from the options below.
  2. Copy and paste the corresponding HTML code into your web page
Email HEader 2016 Student Video Contest

 

Triple-click the text to select

 


Large Rectangle Ad 2016 Student Video Contest

 

Triple-click the text to select

 


EEL Banner 2016 Student Video Contest

 

Triple-click the text to select

 


320x50 Student Video Contest Ad 2016 Student Video Contest

 

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POSTED: August 15, 2016 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , , , ,

Watch the National Economics Challenge Live on CNBC on May 23rd at 1 p.m

7d40faf1 11d3 45dc b5d1 edf0de2a52ec Watch the National Economics Challenge Live on CNBC on May 23rd at 1 p.m
Join us for the 16th Annual National Economics Challenge Finals! The eight team finalists beat out more than 10,000 students to compete for the Championship title! 

  • Watch and root for your favorite team via the live stream on CNBC.com starting at 1 p.m. ET on Monday, May 23rd.
  • CNBC’s Power Lunch will also be airing live snippets from the Challenge from 1-2 pm ET.

  

 
Adam Smith Division
  • Bellaire High School, Bellaire, TX; Team Coach: Michael Clark
  • Carmel High School, Carmel, IN; Team Coach: Michelle Foutz
  • Choate Rosemary Hall, Wallingford, CT; Team Coach: Ted Hartsoe
  • Mounds View High School, Arden Hills, MN; Team Coach: Martha Rush
David Ricardo Division
  • Carmel High School, Carmel, IN; Team Coach: Michelle Foutz
  • Lexington High School, Lexington, MA; Team Coach: Bill Cole
  • Upper Dublin High School, Fort Washington, PA; Team Coach: Steve Roberts
  • West Windsor Plainsboro High School North, Plainsboro, NJ; Team Coach: Morton Levine
 
We hope you’ll tune in to see who will be crowned the Champions for the Adam Smith and David Ricardo Divisions!
 
PS: To see what the teams are up to in New York City prior to the Championship event “follow” us on Twitter and “like” us on Facebook!

 

POSTED: May 18, 2016 | BY: Daniel Thompson | TAGS: , , ,

Rosie Pope’s #MySavingsStory

As you may already know, today is the first day of Financial Literacy Month and we have kicked off our #MySavingsStory video series with mom and entrepreneur, Rosie Pope.

CEE FLM 851x315 Pope R1 Rosie Popes #MySavingsStory

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check her video on our Facebook page and find out how what her father taught her about savings and her one money advice to everyone.

Learn more about the #MySavingsStory campaign and who we’ve enlisted throughout the entire month of April.

POSTED: April 1, 2016 | BY: April Somboun

Celebrating #IWD2016 | Lesson Plans Highlighting Women in the Economy

 

On March 8th, people all over the world will be celebrating International Women’s Day and its theme of gender equality. While women have made progressive strides economically, there is still a long way to go.

According to the World Economic Forum the United States ranks 20th when it comes to the economic gap between men and women. Even Iceland, ranked number one, does not have complete gender parity.

Here are some lessons for middle school and high school students that highlight women in the economy.

The Gender Gap

Women Workers

  • Lowell Workers and Producers Respond to Incentives: At the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, Francis Lowell built textile factories that only employed women. Documents attached to this lesson describe how the women evolved from being complacent to protesting the unfairness of their working conditions. The lesson highlights how economic incentives for factory owners and workers affect their behavior.
  • Worker Safety: The Triangle Fire Legacy: The employees of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory were predominantly young women. When the factory caught fire in 1911, about 150 workers died because most exits were blocked.  This tragedy led to new government policy supporting the safety of workers in all industries.  In this lesson, students assess the potential costs, benefits, and effectiveness of government and labor actions that can be used to improve worker safety.

We hope you’ll celebrate International Women’s Day with us and use these lesson plans as a teachable moment in your classroom.

POSTED: March 2, 2016 | BY: April Somboun

State Leaders Should Provide Professional Development for Our Teachers

By: Derek D’Angelo, President, Michigan Council on Economic Education

Why do you wear your seat belt while in a motor vehicle? I don’t wear my seat belt because of a government requirement, I wear it because my mother was in a horrible accident. It was a cold February morning in 1993 and my mother was on the way to work when her mini-van caught a patch of ice. The vehicle began to slide uncontrollably and she was t-boned on the passenger side by a truck. She was wearing her seat belt, spent a week in the hospital, and eventually made a full recovery.

Michigan was the first state to enact a seat belt law in July of 1985. Initially the legislation was met with much resistance from legislators and a populace whose seat belt usage was less than 20%. In the year of my mother’s accident the seat belt usage rate in Michigan had climbed to 64.4%. Merely establishing a requirement was only a first step toward moving the seat belt usage rate to the 93.3% it sits at today. Just as important was the research that showed people how many lives were saved, the graphic pictures of those who were not, enforcement efforts, and technological improvements to vehicles that followed enactment of the legislation.

Now that 20 state legislatures have jumped the hurdle to require high school students take a course in economics and lawmakers in 17 states require high school students take a course in personal finance, the work has just begun. Seldom do we put enough focus on the importance of the steps following legislative action. Establishing a state requirement is only the first step in the process of building a citizenry equipped to make financially sound decisions. Teachers must be supported through an investment in high-quality professional development. The delivery of this professional development must be strategically designed to target the needs of the teacher within the subject they teach. The model of large auditorium sit-and-get district required professional development should be abandoned for a more differentiated approach that encourages a growth mindset in teachers.

It’s time for a new conversation about teacher improvement. Teachers should receive ongoing professional development, tailored to their unique needs as lead learners in their classrooms. State Councils and Centers for Economic Education are uniquely positioned to provide high-quality, low cost professional development to those teaching economics and financial literacy. Across the nation, State Councils and Centers for Economic Education are equipped to provide the curriculum tools, the pedagogical support, and the community of peers needed for teachers to successfully implement and create the change sought by establishing state standards in economics and financial literacy.

We know that states with economic and financial literacy requirements are more likely to save, more likely to pay off credit cards in full each month, and less likely to be compulsive buyers. In 1985, the establishment of a state requirement in Michigan jumped seat belt usage to 60%, before falling back to 45% shortly thereafter. It is not enough to merely establish a state standard and believe all the problems will go away. The establishment of state standards in economics and financial literacy must be followed by a proper investment in the educators who will be delivering the messages to our children. It seems a much better and more cost-effective option than just hoping children learn from the accidents they witness.

POSTED: February 8, 2016 | BY: April Somboun

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